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Nancy Blum

New Work

November 3 – December 22, 2017

Opening Reception
Friday, November 3
7 – 9 pm

Nancy Blum’s impressive watercolor and colored pencil paintings capture nature’s endless energy. Her large-scale works present elaborate and accurate renditions, yet she composes each piece in an “inaccurate” way—commingling flowers that normally grow apart in nature. She states, “I use botanical motifs to create images that are universally associated with growth and continuity. My deeper intent is to conjure the ‘flower’ as an active, forceful agent, subverting a culturally conditioned point of view that often deems the ephemeral and the organic as less powerful and of limited value. My ‘wonderland’ presents a view of life that pulses with expansive fecundity; hopefully, it also propels comprehension of the connectedness of all beings within the limitless energy operating throughout this world.”

Blum received her MFA from the Cranbrook Academy of Art (1991) and currently lives in Brooklyn, NY. She has exhibited at the Weatherspoon Art Museum, UNC Greensboro, NC; Shore Institute of Contemporary Art, Long Branch, NJ; Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, AZ; The International Print Center, Ricco Maresca Gallery, and the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens, all, NY. Her work is held in the collections of the World Ceramic Exposition Foundation, Icheon, South Korea; The University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA; and the Boise Art Museum; ID, among others. She has executed several public art commissions at venues including the San Francisco General Hospital and New York City’s Dobbs Ferry Station. She has received myriad accolades, including a Pollock‐Krasner Foundation Grant, Peter S. Reed Foundation Grant, Mid‐Atlantic Arts Foundation Creative Fellowship Grant, and a Lower East Side Printshop Fellowship, all, New York, NY.

Press Release

Exhibition List

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Nancy Blum, Mix, 2017, ink, colored pencil, gouache, and graphite on paper, 38 1/2 x 50 inches. Photo by Malcolm Varon.
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